The Hum: Lucky 13

The number 13 is synonymous with bad luck. They say it’s considered unlucky to have 13 guests at a dinner party, many buildings don’t have a 13th floor and so on. Apparently it goes back to the Bible and the last supper, where Christ and the twelve apostles made thirteen people at the table, counting the betrayer, Judas Iscariot.

Judas Iscariot (on right), retiring from the Last Supper, painting by Carl Bloch

That said, for some unknown reason, Wednesday, March 13 turns out to be a good day for showing us the eclectic nature of our Humboldt music scene.

Let’s start with an evening with Lou Barlow at Siren’s Song. You may know the indie rock icon from Dinosaur Jr., Sebadoh, or one of his other bands. I heard he was coming from Chris Colland of Eureka Garbage Co. fame who tried putting a house show together, at least until the Siren’s Song folks stepped in. Lou posted a message explaining…

“In 2019, I continue my small space 7:30 showtime tour. I did this throughout 2018 and it was really good. The general set-length seems to be about 2 1/2 hours, which is what it takes to play the requests I get and the corners of my catalogue (Sebadoh, Folk Implosion, Dinosaur Jr, solo, etc.) [that] I like to touch on every night. I also tend talk about the songs, my kids, and whatever else happened that day. I’m most comfortable in this setting, please join me if you can.”

Don’t hesitate, only 50 tickets available. (It’s probably sold out already.)

Meanwhile 3/13 in Ferndale, at the Old Steeple, iconic singer/songwriter Greg Brown sings a few and tends to “talk about the songs.” (Along the same track, but different.) Again, the show may be sold out. Check before you drive all that way.

At the Arcata Theatre Lounge that night (3/13) it’s Big Wild (aka producer Jackson Stell) who “crafts lush soundscapes and sweeping melodies that challenge the status quo of electronic music,” on his “Superdream Tour.”

Originally a hip-hop beat maker known as J Beatz, Mr. Big shifted gears after leaving Massachusetts on a “life-altering trip to Big Sur,” where he succumbed to Cali’s “natural glory and open spaces to create the atmospheric and wide-spanning Big Wild sound, traversing electronic, indie, pop and beyond.” Openers TBA.

Over at the Miniplex 3/13, it’s Japanese psyche from Loolowningen & The Far East Idiots. (Loolowningentranslates as“wandering people.”) The Tokyo-based “poly/cross/multi/liquid-rhythm/math/prog/alternative rock trio crafts “ink wash painting-like sounds and unicursal rhythms, for all wanderers.”

Like-minded local support supplied by Blackplate and Idyll.

Back in downtown Arcata, Claire Bent and company are at The Basement. They tell us: “Claire and the boys are excited to bring the “funk” to The Basement on Wednesday March 13th! This is an early midweek show from 8 PM to 10 PM for all you early risers 🙂 Claire will turn it on as the Princess of Soul. So if you just want to chill out or want to get those dance grooves moving in your body, come out! We’d love to see you.” I assume the mention of “the funk” means she’s with Citizen Funk, which is a change of pace for The Basement with a shift to rock instead of jazz.

Of course since this is a Wednesday, that means it’s Whomp Whomp Wednesday at The Jam. Appropriately ChopsJunkie of ShadowTrix Music has a track titled “XIII.”

ChopsJunkie

WHOMP Representatives Esch, Riskii, and Elegvnt laid down more EDM…

And last but not least, at Humbrews 3/13, there’s the Grateful Bluegrass Boys with “classic rock through a bluegrass lens,” of course with Dead covers this band out of Santa Cruz.

Is that eclecticism or what?

The Hum: Joan Gold knows color.

Joan Gold messaged me the other day saying, “Hello Bob, I have not been able to put the video on my web site as I would like to have it.” She is referencing a recording I made the other day when she gave an artist’s talk at the Black Faun Gallery. She’d asked if she could use it, of course I said yes, but warned her I’d used a Facebook live feed to broadcast her talk. I wasn’t sure how could she post it.

“I can easily upload a Vimeo or YouTube version if you could convert it,” she continued. “Otherwise, there is another less desirable way I might be able to do it which I will attempt if these other versions are not possible. Obviously I don’t know beans about videos.” She does know color however.

It took some educating for me to figure out how to move the recording from Facebook to YouTube, but eventually I figured it out. Here’s her talk, which you can also watch in her site: joangoldart.com

The Hum: Mardi Gras 2019 Edition

Phat Cat…

Let’s talk holidays, specifically, semi-religious holidays. Carnival and the related Mardi Gras, aka “Fat Tuesday,” are age-old celebrations marking the day before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, when some folks start fasting. Big parties use up all the meat, drink and other stuff they’re about to give up.

As with many Christian holidays, elements of old Pagan rituals have lingered. Wikipedia notes, “Popular practices included wearing masks and costumes, overturning social conventions, dancing, parades, etc.” Are you looking to “parté?

The Mardi Gras & Masquerade Phat Tuesday Parté at Phatsy Kline’s Parlor Lounge has it going on.

Eat, Drink and DANCE!!! ~ Masks encouraged!
No charge to enter! That’s right it’s FREE! 5-7 pm they have “Meowy Hour” drink specials and Jambalaya/Gumbo feasting begins!!! (Supports AC Samoa Soccer)
7 pm Brazilian Butter music DJ Marjo Lak spins Brazilian Bossa Nova
8-10 pm The Bayou Swamis!
10 pm Copperton3
11 pm DJ Learix

Now I posted a note last week asking about gumbo, and this feast seemed to be the local answer. A fan of the Bayou Swamis posted it, and they are definitely ready to laissez les bon temps rouler Cajun style.

Randle Lundberg on accordion – photo by Bob Doran

They tell us,

The Bayou Swamis have stolen the funky Zydeco dance beats from the swamps of Louisiana and planted firmly in the marshes of Humboldt County. They have a repertoire of Cajun two-steps and Zydeco stomps, and they also swamp up classic swing tunes, country standards and traditional ’50s rockers. Their music continues to spread the swamp gospel and to keep fans dancing and clapping into the night!.

A special line-up for this evening will be Randle Lundberg – button accordion, fiddle and vocals / David Bradley – acoustic guitar and vocals / Marla Joy – bass guitar and vocals / Jonathan Kipp – Drums / Kate Koelmel-rubboard, triangle, vocals…

~ Costume up for a chance to win a nights stay at the The Inn at 2nd & C… Green, Gold and Purple Baby!

  • Meanwhile, at The Sanctuary it’s a different sort of music (with accordions) with Szkojáni Charlatans, “aninternationally traveling Balkan & Gypsy quartet based out of Hungary, and bringing Romanian and Hungarian folk tunes with a strong repertoire in Serbian, Bulgarian and Macedonian music,” who are here with Het Hat Club (or maybe it’s some combination of the two, there were two events listings. Anyway, the touring ensemble consists of:
  • Kjartan Code (US): Vocals + Bass
  • Valentin Desmarais (FR): Saxophone
  • Janos Bito (HU): Accordion
  • Isaac Misri (US): Guitar and tambura
Het Hat Club
The Tidepool High Divers

I haven’t heard this band, but I like the clever name, and the smile cowboy shirt on one member, and the photo that comes with it, with attention paid to background (with distant tidepools) although, as a photographer, I couldn’t help but notice something most you probably overlooked: Two out of four band members have their eyes closed. Rule of thumb for group shots: Take at least as many shots as there are members if you want everyone to have their eyes open. We blink much more than you probably think.

This Tuesday youth poets will be shinin’ at Word Humboldt! Incredible local poet Norah Gray will be hosting a special youth open mic to start the night from 630 to 730. All young people 18 and under are free to come rock the mic with us and and then we will have our all ages open mic for the remainder of the night! Bring your words and come and support local youth poetry!

Word Humboldt is a community space for you to speak your truth, be heard, and enjoy yourself away from the stress of the week.
Join us for a night of spoken word, good times and community at Northtown Coffee in Arcata, CA!

(Please forgive me for falling into editor mode, but “press” info does not typically need quite so many exclamation marks!!)

The Jam has another Tuesday thing: Top Grade Tuesdays:
“Get your weekly dose of dancehall, reggae and hip-hop from two of Humboldt’s premiere reggae DJ’s. Alternating weeks hosted by Cassidy Blaze and Real Youth. Check for weekly drink specials and authentic Jamaican cuisine.” (I should mention here, the Jamaican couple who does food there does a fine job.)

ZeroToFierce.org


There’s also an opening reception tonight for Shē-ärt frəm Thə härt/ visual art show, part of the O2F Festival (Zero To Fierce)…
Details on the women-centric event at Arcata Playhouse or ZeroToFierce.org…

The Hum: Darryl sings some for Gypsy ~ Sunday, 3/10

Darryl Cherney is not someone I hear from often. When he sent me a note the other day asking how he can get some ink in the Journal, I had to tell him I haven’t written for them for years. But I’m not out of the game entirely. What was he up to? Well, for one thing, he has a show coming up Sunday at the Arcata Playhouse.

“I’ll be playing solo and free-wheeling it,” he told me. “I’ve got new material including my new KMUD favorite: “In the Shelter of the Cove,” (which has the usual humor and sarcasm). I’ve been talking more, storytelling and slowing and speeding my songs up, getting my soul into it.”

He sent me a press release today, we’ll start with that…

“On the 20th anniversary of the controversial agreement that established the Headwaters Preserve in southern Humboldt County, legendary songwriter, singer, and activist Darryl Cherney will raise awareness and memories with an event Sunday, March 10, an evening at the Arcata Playhouse to benefit the new David Nathan “Gypsy” Chain Memorial Scholarship fund.

Earlier this week at HSU’s Social Justice Summit, Cherney screened the feature movie “Who Bombed Judi Bari?”, a 2012 documentary produced by Darryl about the 1990 car bombing in Oakland on organizer Bari and himself.  

Bari was critically injured in the attack. After the bombing, the FBI arrested Bari and Cherney on suspicion of transporting illegal explosives, but they were never charged due to lack of evidence. Bari and Cherney sued the FBI for violation of their civil rights and won in a landmark case in 2002.”

Next we’ll revisit an old piece I wrote about Mr. Cherney back when I did write for the NCJ: a flash back to Darryl’s West Side Story…

A self-described “dyed-in-the-wool New Yorker,” Cherney was born and raised on the west side of Manhattan. His father was an English teacher; his mother, an office manager. But another strong influence in his youth was Tony Schwartz, one of his neighbors on West 57th Street.

Tony Schwartz records Darryl

Schwartz was a master of electronic media who created more than 20,000 radio and television spots for products, political candidates and non-profit public interest groups. Featured on programs by Bill Moyers, Phil Donahue and Sixty Minutes, among others, Schwartz has been described as a “media guru,” a “media genius” and a “media muscleman.” 

Darryl recalled, “I did over 30 radio, voice over and TV commercials and two radio interviews with Tony by the time my career ended at age 13 (puberty).

“Tony wasn’t interested in actors. He pretty much only used real people in his commercials, giving him both a unique sound and a special place in history. He produced the first anti-cigarette smoking ads, anti-pollution ads, ads for five presidential candidates and countless politicians — about 23,000 in all. He authored two books: The Responsive Chord and Media: The Second God.”

A legend in the New York advertising world, Schwartz is perhaps best known for creating what is known as “the daisy ad,” a television spot for Lyndon Johnson’s campaign against Barry Goldwater that juxtaposed a little girl picking a daisy with an atomic bomb explosion.

Schwartz was also known as a pioneer in using real children in his radio and television commercials. One of the children Schwartz used was young Darryl.

“When I was 5 years old, riding my tricycle in the neighborhood, Tony spotted me and approached my mother, asking if he could do some sound takes,” Cherney recalled. “I did ads for Quaker Oats, for Ivory Snow and Equitable Life Insurance, for high grade bologna. (The vegans will kill me for that one, but I didn’t know.) I made $35,000 by the time I was 11.”

He also recorded a story with young Darryl telling the story of a funeral for his pet turtle Tony Turtle in 1964.

It was in Schwartz’s home studio that Cherney got his initial political education. “I would go over to Tony’s house and be surrounded by politics. It was on the walls, on the bookshelves, in the record library. He had autographed pictures of John Kennedy on the wall — he did four presidential campaigns.”

Cherney said he started getting involved in political campaigns when he was just 9, and music was also part of his life from an early age. He studied classical piano from the age of 7 and got himself a guitar at 10. “I picked up the guitar, and as soon as I had learned three chords, I started writing songs: political songs, or even environmental songs.”

It began with “The Long Island Expressway in Rush Hour,” a song about congested traffic set to the tune of “Snoopy and the Red Baron,” and other parodies.

As he grew older he continued songwriting, but was dissatisfied with it. “I knew that there was something I didn’t know, something missing in my consciousness. And it was reflected in my songs; they were not sophisticated enough, not analytical. They didn’t embrace a holistic politicism. Maybe I hadn’t formed an ideology yet.”

Mover-shaker-Pagan

By 1982, Cherney had graduated from Fordham University in New York City with a BA in English and a master’s degree in education. Besides teaching at a local business school, he dabbled in marketing on the side.

He also got involved in the New York City Folk Musicians Cooperative, an organization run by the folksinger Jack Hardy.

At the time Cherney was earning a living as a “man with a van,” through a business he called Prime Mover. “I would use other folk musicians for my crew,” he recalled.

The co-op was where Cherney met Judy Zweiman, “my first Judy, I call her. She was playing bass with a group, Josh Joffen and Late for Dinner. We dated pretty steady for a couple of years, from ’84 to ’85.”

Zweiman introduced Cherney to the spiritual practice of paganism, not long before he left New York for California. “She told me I was a pagan and I didn’t know it. Eventually I knew it. I’ve been a practicing pagan since 1984. I’m a lifetime member of the Church of All Worlds.”

What does it mean to be a pagan? “It means I honor the Goddess as well as honoring God. It means that I see the divine in all things, whether it be the wind, the sun or a blade of grass. I see different elements of the sacred. It means that I participate in rituals: We greet the four seasons with ceremonies.”

Heading west

In 1985, Cherney the moving man decided to pack his 1976 Dodge and move himself, leaving New York. “I had pre-rented a place in San Francisco. I did not have any job in mind, but I knew you could always make money moving furniture.”

He also knew he “wanted to do something political, to work for social change.” In an oft-told tale, he recounted how he was diverted on his way to San Francisco after picking up Kingfisher, a traveling Cheyenne “road man” somewhere in Oregon.

“Kingfisher asked me, `What do you want out of life?’ I said, `I want to learn how to live off the land and save the world.’ He said he knew where I needed to go: Garberville. When we drove into town he took me straight to the EPIC office.”

The nonprofit advocacy organization EPIC formed in 1977 around a successful campaign opposing the timber industry practice of aerial herbicide spraying. By 1985 the group was working on a variety of other timber-related issues.

“I immediately started learning about the redwoods falling,” said Cherney. “I arrived in November of ’85, right after [Charles] Hurwitz made his bid to take over Pacific Lumber. That’s what was in the headlines at the moment. Here I was a New Yorker, a provincial Manhattanite, so I was like, `What? You can cut down the redwoods?’ When I found out they were clear-cutting them, I couldn’t conceive of it; I didn’t believe it could be legal.”

While he was working with EPIC, another group caught his eye: the more radical environmentalists known as Earth First! Cherney had never heard of them before he saw a sticker on the door of the EPIC office showing the Earth First! clenched fist logo.

“What differentiates Earth First! from other environmental advocacy [groups] is the fact that direct action strategies are employed,” explained Karen Pickett, an Earth Firster since 1983 who works with the Bay Area Coalition for Headwaters.

Asking around, Cherney found that there were no Earth Firsters active on the North Coast in the mid-1980s. “Bill Devall at Humboldt State had had an Earth First! group in Arcata that took on the G-O Road [plans for a road from Gasquet to Orleans through land considered sacred by local tribes]. In Mendocino they had formed around the Sinkyone [wilderness issue]. They had come and gone. So I was not the first Earth Firster [in this area]; I just rejuvenated it, along with Greg King and eventually Judi Bari, of course. We brought it to a new level.”

Darryl and crew – photo by Greg King

While EPIC was fighting battles on several fronts, before long Cherney and the journalist King, who met in 1986, pulled together a cadre of Earth Firsters and mounted a campaign to save a grove of redwoods on Pacific Lumber property near Fortuna known as Headwaters Forest.

Read the 2002 piece “Outside Agitator: How Darryl Cherney Set Out To Save The Redwoods And Ended Up Suing The FBI (And Winning)”
BY GREG KING ~ (SEPTEMBER 2002) ~HERE

In doing so “he brought into focus a totally unknown world view for most of the resource-oriented community around here,” said 2nd District Supervisor Roger Rodoni.

“He did not become everybody’s friend. He was the guy, if you [were talking] about a timber protest, Redwood Summer, Earth First! all of that side of the equation, Darryl Cherney’s name was going to be in the forefront. He was the pioneer. Sure, there’s a lot of people who are going to say that’s not good. Me, I’m not so quick to say that’s not good. If it took Darryl Cherney to create that awareness, that’s a positive thing.”

According to Pickett, “Darryl played a major role in the forest campaign in Northern California and in the Earth First! movement in general. He’s been a very visible and vocal character in the landscape. He’s a skilled organizer, and one of the things he brought to the forest campaign and to the larger movement was his musical ability.”

Utilizing his background in PR, Cherney bombarded local and national media with press releases about various demonstrations, many orchestrated with theatrical pizzazz, and punctuated by his topical songs.

He became a master at the provocative sound bite, the face of radical environmentalism on the North Coast. In the eyes of those he opposed, a target for anger at the environmental movement in general.

“In some ways he was someone to vilify,” said Mason. “But if it wasn’t him, it would be someone else, someone like me.”

In 1988 Cherney ran for Congress in the Democratic primary, calling himself “the singing candidate.” While he lost the race to incumbent Doug Bosco, he gained a new collaborator along the way, a politically aware graphic artist and organizer who volunteered her services: Judi Bari. As an added bonus, she played fiddle. They became partners and lovers.A

In 1990 while Californians were preparing to vote on the future of timber harvesting, choosing between the Forests Forever initiative crafted by environmentalists and a rival initiative put forward by the timber industry, Bari and Cherney declared “Redwood Summer.” It was a series of protests emulating the Mississippi Freedom Summer, 1964, when voter registration workers descended on America’s South as part of the fight for civil rights.

“Earth First! raised the profile of what was happening,” Mason recalled. “Clearly the world came to see that (lumber companies) were still clear-cutting ancient redwoods.”R

Judi Bari and her fiddle

What happened next sent shock waves through the movement. While Bari and Cherney were driving through Oakland on their way to play a concert in Santa Cruz, a homemade bomb exploded in Bari’s car. The police and FBI accused the activists of carrying the bomb themselves. The lawsuit filed by Bari and Cherney alleging violation of their civil rights was settled in their favor. (The identity of the bomber has never been established.)

At least 3,000 protesters came from across the United States to participate in Redwood Summer protests in Humboldt County and elsewhere in the state. While Bari spent most of the summer in the hospital and rehab, she emerged for an August rally in San Francisco in her honor. The Headwaters Deal, which preserves about 10,000 acres of woodlands, was clinched in 1999.

A different activism

Darryl sang through it all, noting that his writing changed. For one thing he says he expanded his focus “outside the redwood region to world politics. I’m speaking more in what I’d call the authentic first person. When I’m singing `You Can’t Clear-cut Your Way to Heaven’ or `Where You Gonna Work When the Trees Are Gone?’ I’m pretending to be someone else. But now, I’m writing in the first person and actually singing about me.”

Of course he still gets political…

And he still sings for his old comrades. “My favorite audience is still around the campfire, without any amplification. For me, that’s the ideal stage, singing for people who may be going out to get arrested the next day doing a forest action or a tree-sit. The effect that the music has on them may be even more powerful than if I were on the radio broadcasting to thousands. You just don’t get as famous.”

David “Gypsy” Chain

On Sunday, March 10 Cherney takes the stage at the Arcata Playhouse to entertain and educate with his political songs and stories from his years as an organizer with Earth First!  

Naomi Steinberg, one of the event organizers, comments, “Darryl is just the right person to lead us in a reflection on the Headwaters deal concluded 20 years ago.  His songs are as powerful, passionate and funny as ever… We can enjoy a reunion of old activists and hopefully inspire some young ones.”

The event Sunday is a benefit for the David Nathan Gypsy Chain Memorial Scholarship Fund. Admission is $20 and up (additional donations appreciated), but FREE to students. Doors open at 7 p.m. the program begins at 7:30.

The David Nathan Gypsy Chain Memorial Scholarship was established to remember a young activist killed in 1998 while protesting illegal logging in the Grizzly Creek watershed.  Make a tax-deductible donation online or by mail through the Humboldt Area Foundation, which administers the scholarship fund. For information, see http://www.davidgypsychain.org or http://www.hafoundation.org/GypsyChain

Student applications are now open for the $1000 scholarship, until March 15, through the Humboldt Area Foundation’s scholarship website at http://www.hafoundation.org/GypsyChain or https://www.hafoundation.org/Grants-Scholarships/Scholarships-Apply-Now . Students can also learn more about the scholarship and how to apply for it at https://hafscholar.fluidreview.com/p/a/19205 .

The scholarship will be given to a student graduating from a Humboldt high school and planning to attend HSU or CR, or to a continuing first year HSU or CR student, who demonstrates commitment to environmental protection through study and activism. 

The Hum: Jerry, Thad & Co. In Like a Lion~2/28~3/1


They say “March comes in like a lion and out like a lamb,” although whether the wet weather will finally dry up, well, that still remains to be seen. 

For me, late February meant a missive from my old drummer pal, Danny Montgomery who wrote,

“Back in California, two shows on the horizon—Thursday, Feb. 28 at the Arcata Playhouse with Jerry Martien and the Band of Angels featuring Thad Beckman and Fred Neighbor, with Gary Davidson and m


Mr. Martien (the acclaimed Humboldt poet) describes the “new stuff” as, “Country blues accompanying story and lyric of the Dust Bowl and the Okies, our present disrupted systems, natural and political, humans and birds caught up in a crisis of migration and refuge.” Expect thoughtful rumination on current events.    

Danny’s second show is the next night, Friday, March 1, “the homecoming” of Thad Beckman and Band. “Gary and I will be accompanying the Thadster,” he explained. “You can expect a new CD from Thad and some special guests.” 

Thad Beckman – photo by Craig Chisholm

Among the special guests, Barney Doyle, who I met recently at the Co-op’s Clear-Out-The-Ten-Pin-Building fire sale, where he was helping out since he recently relocated to Arcata to take a job as controller for the Co-op.

Barney Doyle (in the 10 Pin Building) – snap by Bob D…

We got to talking about music. It seemed he’d sat in the night before with The Handshakers, taking guitarist Michael Walker’s chair (a story for another day).

Turns out Barney and Danny have known each other for ages, same thing for Danny and Gary, who have been playing together for 50 years.

As Danny explained, “I’ve been playing with Barney for over 45 years.We began in the summer of ’73 in a band called Hog Wild, playing Walt’s Friendly Tavern and the Mad River Rose… [Those were the days…] He’ll be sitting in with us on that Friday with Thad. You know Barney was a member of Mickey Hart’s band…” among other bands.

“Gary and I met in the 4th grade in Fremont, CA. . . Our moms played on the same softball team. . . We began playing [music] together in high school in the stage/jazz band. Then I put together a big band called Just Jazz, that we played in. We also had a trio that I played vibraphone in. . . Our first bona fide paid gig wasn’t until NYE 1971. . . Then some years later, in the mid 70s, Gary joined a band I was playing with from a fraternity, Sigma Phi, at Cal, Berkeley. That band, Short Notice still plays, and has a recent Arcata transplant in it, Barney Doyle. . . When Gary moved to Humboldt, we began playing with several local artists, Joyce Hough, Fred Neighbor, Thad Beckman, Dr. Ross, (ask Gary for any I’ve missed). . . Also, Gary and I have done numerous recording sessions. Many for the song writing team of Parvin-Patterson

More cowbell please
Gary…

“And 3 or 4 of Thad’s albums. . . .

We’ll be recording a live CD from the Jerry Martien concert on the 28th [renamed] “Jerry Martien and The Band Of We’re No Angels”. . .

Thad and Co. at the Playhouse 2017

The Hum: Down in the Basement

 

The Basement is a relatively new nightclub in the “basement” of Jacoby’s Storehouse (below the Union office). While they started out with music only on Fridays, they’ve booked combos Thursday through Saturday, mostly on the jazzy side. 

I used to go there when it was called Brett Harte’s, then Bergie’s, I saw Robert Cray Band there more than once, and Taj Mahal, and many others. The low ceilings with acoustic tile facilitate conversation. It’s a nice place to have a drink and hear good music.

RLATrio On Valentine’s Day, (the 14th) the real <3 holiday in The Basement, Tim Randles leads RLA Trio, with Mike LaBolle on drums and Ken Lawrence on electric bass. You might think, hmmm, that name doesn’t quite make sense, well, the trio (shown above) once included Bobby Amirkhanian on bass, but he’s since sailed away to work on cruise ships. Ken took over the bass chair. So far they’ve stuck with old initial name explaining LA is kind of short for Lawrence, but I think they should come up with a real name. In fact, one has occured to me The TiMiKen Trio. What do you think?

On Friday, Feb. 15, it’s the Julie Froblom Trio (Julie on sax, with Blake Brown on guitar and Danny Gaon on bass. On Saturday, Feb. 16, when I first wrote this item for the Union, they had a band listed, they’ve since changed their minds.

The Friday, Feb. 22, band was listed as the Tavola Quartet, who described themselves as “old souls.” They have since become “Front Ear (formally Tavola”). Saturday, Feb. 23, they shift gears a bit with multi-instrumentalist Seabury Gould and Mark Jenny, who plays, well I wasn’t sure what, since Seabury in a very eclectic guy bouncing from Indian kirtan to Celtic jigs and occasionally jazz tunes. That night he tells me he’ll be playing, “mostly blues and some jazz. Mark is an accomplished veteran guitarist. His slide guitar chops are mighty fine. And I’ll be playing guitar & piano (keyboard).”

Ending the month of February on Thursday, the 28th, Claire Bent shows off her jazzy side, leaving her Citizen Funk band at home, at least part of it anyway. As far as I can tell, Claire was listed as that band playing Saturday.

RJA presents Charles McPherson 2/28 @ Fulkerson Hall, HSU

Charles McPherson

Sometime around 1953, a young Charles McPherson heard Charlie Parker’s “Tico Tico” on a Detroit jukebox and his life was forever changed. “I was completely floored,” he says, “and from that point on, it was like, ‘that’s it.’”

Before the end of the decade, Charles was playing alto sax with Parker’s contemporaries and forging a career that’s continued for over six decades. During that span, he’s collaborated with the likes of Barry Harris, Art Farmer, Pepper Adams, Kenny Drew, George Coleman, Eric Dolphy, Lionel Hampton, and Charles Mingus, in whose band McPherson played for twelve years.

“His ardent, chirruping attack became a defining component of the ensemble,” says Giovanni Russonello in the New York Times. The list of famous collaborators goes on: Paul Chambers, Ron Carter, Billy Eckstine, Tommy Flanagan, Tom Harrell, Billy Higgins, Sam Jones, Cedar Walton…and on: Adderley, Brecker, Marsalis, Byard….

As a leader, McPherson has released over 25 albums and fronted dozens of bands, often exploring new approaches and configurations, but always rooted in the sound that enchanted him as a kid. A master of the bebop idiom, McPherson even played the saxophone voice of Charlie Parker for Clint Eastwood’s 1988 biopic, Bird

For lovers of bebop, then, you won’t get any closer to the real thing than seeing this legend in person.  As The New Yorker put it recently: “to witness an authentic master of the art, like the altoist McPherson, can still elicit a genuine spinal chill.”

As a composer, McPherson has worked most recently in collaboration with San Diego Ballet, who in 2015 premiered his Sweet Synergy Suite, a large-scale piece for jazz ensemble with choreography by Javier Velasco.

This May, the Ballet will premiere his newest work, Song of Songs. McPherson has also received a slew of awards for his historic contributions to jazz, including an honorary CSU doctorate in 2015. This April, Jazz at Lincoln Center will help him celebrate his 80th birthday, together with McCoy Tyner’s, by premiering new arrangements of some of the two men’s most iconic compositions.

Backing up McPherson for this RJA appearance, which is supported in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, via the Western Jazz Presenters Network, is a trio of top-notch accompanists.  Pianist, composer, and arranger Jeb Patton is a regular with acts like the Heath Brothers, The Dizzy Gillespie All Stars, George Coleman, and Jon Faddis, as well as his own trio.

L. A. bassist Jeff Littleton has worked with everyone from Herbie Hancock to Nancy Wilson, Freddie Hubbard, Pharoah Sanders, Billy Higgins, and Charles Lloyd.  Billy Drummond, who got his start playing drums for greats including Horace Silver, Sonny Rollins, Joe Henderson, and Bobby Hutcherson, has lent his versatile style to hundreds of records and released a handful of acclaim-winning albums as a leader.

 Show Thursday, February 28, 2019, 8 p.m., Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Advance tickets ($15 General Admission, $10 Students & Seniors) to the concert by the Charles McPherson Quartet are available online at RedwoodJazzAlliance.org and locally at Wildberries, Wildwood Music, People’s Records, and The Works.

With support from HSU’s College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, the trio will also present an informal pre-concert workshop, free and open to the public, on the afternoon of February 28th in the HSU Music Department (exact time location TBA).  For additional details and up-to-date information, please visit www.RedwoodJazzAlliance.org.  

RJA

The Redwood Jazz Alliance is a 401(c)(3) non-profit charity dedicated to jazz performance and education by touring artists of national and international renown.  Since 2006, with the aid of local businesses, professionals, and individual members, and in partnership with HSU’s Department of Music and College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, as well as the Humboldt Arts Council, the Humboldt Folklife Society, the Arcata Playhouse, and Center Arts, it has presented dozens of concerts and educational workshops. 

Its 2018-19 season will conclude in April with the return of bassist Shao-Way Wu, in a new trio with Randy and Gabe Porter.


The Hum: Grivo @ the Miniplex (and/or The Goat) plus…

Tonight, Friday, Feb. 8 at the Miniplex (in the Goat) Austin-based alt. power trio Grivo mashes together doom metal and shoegaze (if that’s possible).

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“Call it rock, or call it shoegaze… whichever, this one kicks. Hard.” -TinyMixTapes

Austin-based power trio GRIVO unleashed their ominously trudging sound with the debut full length ‘Elude’ in November on the HOLODECK label (of  STRANGER THINGS soundtrack fame) . Combining slow, methodical hooks and warm tube amplifiers, Grivo’s massive tones artfully re-establish the link between heavy guitars and downtempo pop to yield a potently encompassing experience. Utilizing effects as an active compositional element, Elude’s infectious riffs are brilliantly crafted and paced to allow the saturated guitars and bruising low-end to fully bloom. Within the tidal sound waves and bleak timbre, Grivo forges a distinctive personal connection that challenges the modern definitions of doom metal and shoegaze.

“Leaning into the heavier end of the shoegaze spectrum, Austin’s Grivo take inspiration from the dark, drug-induced beauty that lies just beneath the brutality.” -REVOLVER

 

 

 

grivo

Grivo on Bandcamp
Again that’s Friday, February 8 / 9 pm / $10 / $7 advance / with local openers,  Ensemble Economique (globe-trotting, cinematic avant-ambient aka Jacob Sweden) and CV, a local goth-rock supergroup feat. Robert Tripp, Tavan Anderson, Aimee Hennessy, etc. (members of White Manna, The Hard Ride, Nipplepotamus, & Blood Gnome) / 21 & up.

Humming along after Breakfast…

As you may or may not know, the Breakfast All Day Collective‘s “safer space,” Outer Space, is celebrating turning two years of operation on Friday, Feb. 1.

Sarah Torres

The 2nd birthday party features Arcata High hip hop collective 4 The Masses, local garage punks Wet Spot, indigenous activist/singer/songwriter Sarah Torres with cousin Adam, and the spoken word artists of Word Humboldt, who typically hold down the word fort Tuesdays at Northtown Coffee.

Interview by Bob Doran, podcast mix by John Hardin

If you’ve been reading the Hum for awhile, you know that the BAD Collective followed in the footsteps of something called The Placebo, a loosely knit group of kids that came together to create a space where they could hang out and have occasional shows with local and touring bands.

As Placebo founder Abe Ray explained, “We decided that Arcata needed a more permanent music venue, one that catered to all ages and brought bands into the area.” This was way back in 1999, when Ray and a bandmate took out a loan from their parents to pay rent for a warehouse space on South G Street in Arcata (somewhere near what is now Redwood Curtain). The name Placebo was chosen to indicate the drug-free environment they insisted on at the venue.

“We didn’t really know what we were doing; we just did it,” said Ray. “Up ’til then, I was basically just a kid who went to shows. We hooked up with some people who knew how to put on shows…” The rest is history, at this point ancient history.

The Placebo crew poses in front of their space in Manila – photo by Bob Doran

The Placebo put on a bunch of shows until the City got wind of their unpermitted venue. The kids were for the most part teenagers, and they didn’t know what hoops they were supposed to go through to go legit. Their venue was shut down. They tried again a couple of times, first in Manila, in an old classroom in the community center, where neighbors complained about the noisy shows, then later on in Eureka, where they shared a building on West Third Street with a couple of artist collectives: Empire Squared, and Synapsis, the baby of trapeze artist Leslie Castellano. Again, there were permit troubles and neighbors who complained about noise.

While Leslie, persevered and eventually moved Synapsis to another space in Old Town (and was elected to the Eureka City Council), the members Empire Squared mostly graduated and moved on. The Placebo’s founders did the same, leaving behind a ghost that still exists, but only as a dysfunctional Facebook page.

The founders of the Breakfast All Day Collective and its safer space Outer Space did not have to suffer the same “slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” that took down Placebo, but they still need our support. (For more history, read Lauraine’s piece for the Union.) Outer Space’s space on 11th St. was once home to Copeland Lumber, which was replaced by Nilsen Feed’s short-lived store hiding ‘round the corner. Now that Nilsen has thrown in the towel (for whatever reason), the BAD folks are not totally sure what will happen next, but they’re been good tenants, so they hope they’ll get to stay. We’ll see. If it looks like they need more help, say yes. And go check out a show.

Wednesday, Feb. 6. look for folky fare with Buck Meek from Austin, Texas (getting for a tour in support for Jeff Tweedy)…

Buck is currently on tour with his Keeled Scales label-mate Twain from Virginia

and local support from Hollan and Emelia Grace

The shows just keep coming. Friday, Feb. 15, 7-10 p.m. It’s two new young groups from Arcata, Petty Education (also playing at Redwood Yogurt Friday, Feb. 8) and mash yellow bird

As February stumbles to a close Wednesday, Feb. 27, Outer Space hosts the appropriately named, awakebutstillinbed (San Jose screamo)

plus Sundressed (AZ folk punk), Sunsleeper (SLC sad rock) and Alien Boy, who is a punker from PDX, not from outer space.

Remember, all Outer Space shows start and end early (7-ish-10 p.m.) so the kids (and seniors like me) can get to bed early. Also, remember when you were younger and needed a safe place to play. That’s all they ask…

The Hum is back (in print)

Yes, it’s true. The Hum is back. Back in print in the Mad River Union anyway. It never totally disappeared online (here at thehum.online), but I needed a break. I had more pressing things to do — like lay my friend to rest, then, my mom. The print Hum will be different. Watch for it semimonthly.

I explained all this when I ran into a couple of friends other day on Bar Row. One of them was in the Raging Grannies with my dear old mother. After sincere condolences and some talk about what a fine lady she was, I mentioned that I was bringing the Hum back. 

Her friend is a local musician, so of course he was glad to hear about the return. ‘What should I mention?’ I wondered. “Well, definitely the Nels Cline show,” said the local musician, Gary Davidson, who has been playing bass in various local combos for decades. 

Gary Davidson at the Folklife Festival – photo by Bob Doran

Needless to say, that show Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Arcata Playhouse is hopelessly sold out. (Miracle tickets required. Ask around.) Nels Cline 4 is led by Mr. Cline, the awesome Wilco guitarist…

It also features the 20-something Julian Lage, who played here with his band recently, and, memorably, with David Grisman a few years ago. In a JazzTimes interview, Lage says he’d “found his people” playing with Cline. “At last I found a scenario where you could be free and adventurous, you could utilize sound and be extremely melodic and evocative.” I’m ready for an adventure.

Gary also figured he had to mention a benefit at the Bayside Community Hall (formerly known as the Grange) since he plays in both bands on the two-fer bill: Home Cookin’ and The Handshakers.

Cover from Freddy and the Starliner album by Martin Wong

It gives away my age, but I can’t help but think of Home Cookin’ as the latest incarnation of Freddy and the Starliners, a band with Jambalaya founders Fred Neighbor and Joyce Hough from before Gary moved here. 

The Handshakers were once known as Rogues’ Gallery. A pair of Georgia-born guitarist/songwriters, Mike Bynum and luthier Michael Walker, are out front, with Aleister Paige on pedal steel.

The Delta Nationals in front of the B.C. Hall – photo by Bob Doran

They changed names when Gary joined with rhythm partner Paul DeMark on drums. BTW, Paul officially announced the end of the venerable Delta Nationals after 18 years. Just to keep busy, Paul started another band, a jazz trio PD 3, with Fred on guitar and Bruce “Junior” Johnson on standup bass. (Fred and Junior also play as a duo known as Fred & Junior.) 

This “Double the Money Hallabaloo” promises an “evening of dinner and music” with an early start, beginning with a home-cooked meal at 5:30 p.m. Handshakers at 7, with Home Cookin’ closing. All money raised for the B.C. Hall renovation will be matched by an anonymous donor. “This will be a fun evening for a good cause,” says Joyce. “I have many, many fond memories of playing in this building!! You probably do too.” Indeed I do. 

Illustration from The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám

Before we parted on Bar Row, Gary had another gig to mention. Yet another outfit he plays with, Rosewater: A Tribute to the Grateful Dead, is at the Clam Beach Tavern (in McKinleyville) on Friday, Feb. 15.

Along the same lines, The Miracle Show offers “top shelf Grateful Dead,” at the Jam on the same night (2/15) declaring, “The music plays the band.”

There’s also a “Grateful Dead Dance Party” at Humbrews this Saturday (2/2) with Dead vids augmented by a light show by Marmalade Sky. Also, you just missed Dead On, a local trio “exploring the acoustic side of The Grateful Dead.”

Gary had a simple explanation about the plethora of Dead cover bands locally. “There’s all these great songs and we love playing them, and the people keep coming out to hear them.”

Speaking of tribute bands, Piet Dalmolen and the Pink Floyd cover band Money play that song and others from that catalog at Humbrews Friday, Feb. 1. They promise “lights and projections by Shawn Lei and a few new tricks up our sleeve.” (Remember the old days when light shows were listed along with the bands?)

More covers etc. coming up at The Jam, with a month of Sunday kid-friendly afternoon shows labeled “Fam Jam,” all from 1-4 p.m. Youngins get in free (with adults). First up, Feb. 10, Silver Hammer: A Beatles Tribute, then the following Sunday, Feb. 17, reggae tunes by Irie Rockers, and, rounding things out Feb. 24, All Things Must Pass—a Birthday Tribute to George Harrison. (His b-day is actually the next day, but it’s close enough.  

There’s more of this column in the paper and you can pick it up at your neighborhood news stand (Northtown Books for example) or you can wait until later, when I get around to posting some more, including some stuff that’s not in the paper.

The magazine rack at Northtown Books, curated by Jay Aubrey-Herzog – photo by Bob Doran shot for the NC Journal when we declared it “Best Magazine Rack” around in 2010.